Join The Resistance2018-07-11T13:10:12+00:00

Join The Resistance

Bully Blitz anti-bullying event
Bully resistance

Being the Resistance together.

160,000 students skip school every day for fear of being bullied. The Internet has unleashed meanness to a degree unseen before.

Peers are the strongest deterrent and the absolute game-changer in this epidemic. All it takes is a handful of empowered kids to change the direction of a whole school.

Meet some people who decided not to tolerate bullying in their schools. They wear the No symbol together and stand together against the cruelty and harassment they see at school.

They are not willing to stand by and watch bullying happen around them anymore. They will not enable the bullies. They know their school is their house.

Some were victims and some were bystanders. They’re over it.

Enough is enough. Join The Resistance.

the Resistance.

There are programs in schools like Peer Advocacy which partners an able-bodied student with a student who has a disability. These are great because it helps eliminate the times disabled kids are alone and most susceptible to bullying. But what if an entire school was a peer advocate for each other, simply by being in the majority? A system where the bullies are the minorities because the majority is The Resistance.

Bully Blitz Live events talk about how to do this and how to make it catch on like wildfire.

Studies done by Prevnet.ca claim “Peers intervene more frequently than teachers and their interventions are effective in stopping bullying more than half the time.”

Enough is enough. Join The Resistance.

Find out how to sponsor this anti-bullying event in your school.

Go to the Bully Blitz home page.

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Findings from Prevnet.ca

The Bystander Role
• Bystanders are present in at least 85% of bullying episodes they observed among elementary school students, with two or more peers present in more than half of the incidents.
• Peers contribute to bullying by providing attention and reinforcement to the child who is bullying, as well as by joining in bullying.
• The mere presence of bystanders in a verbal dispute between parties of the same gender increases the likelihood that the dispute will turn violent.
• Because most bullying incidents occur in the presence of peers and out of sight of adults, the secrecy expands to include entire circles of peers.
• Bystanders who witness repeated victimization of peers experience negative effects similar to children who were victimized. Children in both groups showed distress similar to or in excess of that reported for natural disasters or other life threatening experiences.
• If the person being victimized is a stranger, but the bystanders comprise a socially cohesive group, there is a higher likelihood that they will intervene.

Peers’ Roles in Intervention
• One study of children 9 to 13 years old found that younger children who witnessed bullying were more likely to try to stop the incident or to tell someone than to simply watch or join in.
• Peers intervene more frequently than teachers and their interventions are effective in stopping bullying more than half the time.
• Interventions that acknowledge the role of bystanders and the group as a whole, show positive results in terms of promoting prosocial attitudes.
• Interventions that focused on social skills training for children with peer relationship difficulties found that improving peer relationships lowers antisocial affiliations, and has a positive effect on aggressive children, decreasing levels of aggression and peer victimization.
• There is a code of silence that creates barriers for victims to disclose that they are experiencing bullying. Children who are bullied are as likely to tell a friend as they are to tell a family member about being victimized.

Key Themes
• Peers contribute to the dynamics within bullying.
• The relationship between peers and bullying is complex and exists at multiple levels.
• As bystanders and those engaged in bullying and/or victimization, peers have the potential to either promote or prevent the incidence and negative effects of bullying. They can be part of the problem or part of the solution.
• Effective interventions must address the peer group as a whole.

Find out how to sponsor this anti-bullying event in your school.

Go to the Bully Blitz home page.